Mobile etiquette

I realise that social rules applying to the public use of mobile phones are slowly evolving; yet I believe that there are a still few aspects of such use that need sorting out sooner rather than later.

Trains

We’ve all heard the guy (or gal?) on the train conducting his business at mega dB and driving everyone to distraction; he needs sorting out the soonest.

I think that some people just go into a bubble when their phone rings, a bubble that excludes everyone and everything around them, something they would probably never do on any other occasion.  I once heard a former boss of mine conduct job contract negotiations on her mobile, to the rapt attention of everyone in the carriage.

Nevertheless, I have also begun to notice that some mobile phone users now move out of the main carriage to make their calls. Also, (and I count myself in both of these groups) I notice that some call recipients quietly move to the doorway nowadays, before continuing their conversation. I’ve also noted increased use of the simple I’m on a train, can I call you back? I suppose that’s progress.

Many of these calls are essential – I realise and concur with that. I’ve very often told prospective customers and clients to call me while I’m on the train, because a) the time I’m on the train suits them and b) because when I get to my destination I’ll be doing something else and the phone will be off*. However, like many others I now take or make those calls away from fellow passengers. It’s not that the call is particularly sensitive or secret, it’s mainly because I (we?) realise that it’s an annoyance to other passengers.

So we just need to convince ‘that guy’!

Restaurants

How many of us use our mobile phones to photograph things as we go about our daily business? I do!

I also photograph attractive dishes when eating out no matter whether it’s a £75 per head jobbie or just a particularly attractive sandwich I’ve bought for £1.99. I may even have made the food myself! I did once ask myself: ‘does this annoy fellow diners?’ and at one time, it probably did, but I think it’s less annoying and more prevalent now than it was a few years ago. Imagine all of the different groups sat along a Wagamama table taking mobile shots of their food as it arrives. I’ve seen it happen.

But what about those folks who insist on leaving their phone turned on in the restaurant, or in a meeting [see below], or in the cinema? What sort of selfishness does that display? After all it doesn’t take much effort (or thought) to switch over to silent-mode.

We all make mistakes, but 99 times out of a hundred, *I will turn my phone to silent or ‘off’ depending on the circumstance. I don’t want to disturb my fellow diners, or colleagues in a meeting by interrupting proceedings and I certainly don’t want disturbing in the cinema.

Talking about business meetings: In her book “Watching the English, The Hidden Rules of English Behaviour”, Kate Fox discusses the issue and suggests that

There are [..] as yet no agreed rules of etiquette on the use of mobile phones during business meetings.” page 85.

Will more people start turning off/silent from now on?

Driving

Surely this is the most annoying thing that people do with their mobile phones? Talking on the phone whilst driving is both dangerous and illegal. I used to do it – I don’t anymore.

Let me clarify that:

I use a hands free kit when driving but when possible will pull over if I receive a call because I know it can be distracting. I’ve seen so many people holding their phones to their ear whilst driving that it drives (sorry) me to distraction. These people are no longer fully aware of what’s going on around them – I’ve seen drivers drift over to the wrong side of the road, or slow down almost to a stop (in moving traffic) and as I pass their car, a closer look sees them ‘on the phone’.

How long will it be before we all adhere to mutually accepted social rules that define mobile phone use in practice?
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[Texting in various circumstances is another subject, one I will leave for the moment.]
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Travel chaos

What can I say? Today has (so far) been a complete waste of time. A combination of weather and a comedy of travel errors has diverted my day. Big time.

I set off at 7.20am to catch the 7.57am train to Leeds. It was raining hard and had rained hard all night – but we live in the Pennines, so what? My train was delayed by nine minutes – I had a twelve minutes change over in Leeds: so that’s when my worries started. Thanks to Ron Mitchel and Sharon I was kept fully informed of developments and of alternative routes. My destination had been Nottingham, to attend the CAPITAL (Curriculum and Pedagogy in Technology Assisted Learning) meeting set up by Nick Jeans of SERO.

As it happened, my twelve minute change over didn’t become a problem because a) we arrived in Leeds less than nine minutes late and b) the 8.40am to London (via Newark, where I would meet Ron) never moved in the entire time I was in Leeds. I’d found my seat when an announcement came on to say that because the electrical power system at Leeds was having “some difficulties” and that “this train” was electric – we may be a little delayed. Furthermore, it appeared that overnight, someone had stolen signal cables outside Wakefield, so even when we got started, going would be very slow until after Wakefield. The 09.05am train to London had already been canceled, but this (the 08.40am) was still unsure of its morning’s duties.

So was I!

Because of a derailment near York yesterday [BBC News], the Trans-Pennine routes were in some disarray too. All trains north were disrupted and as a result, many of those to the west were also delayed or canceled. The notice boards were in complete chaos. The guards and assistants were being as helpful as they could be, but things were changing so fast that even they were relying on the boards – which were not helpful. I eventually got back to Huddersfield on a train that (it would appear) had been kidnapped and turned around. I think it had been heading north and I think that the driver was still determined to take it north, but the announcement and the dodgy boards now said it would go back west to Liverpool. Who convinced the driver of this I’m not sure, but it did go back west. As I got off in Huddersfield, there was still some uncertainty about its destination – Manchester Piccadilly or Liverpool Lime Street. I suspect that the problem here was driver-knowledge. If he wasn’t conversant with the ‘road’ he wouldn’t be able to take the train beyond Manchester (more Trans-Pennine trains go to Manchester than to Liverpool, so this is likely).

Anyway, having got to Huddersfield, my problems were not over. I’d missed the local bus (twice a day – once on Wednesdays 🙂 and knew I had a short walk ahead of me – but hadn’t anticipated the swim. The bottom of my hill was flooded. Whilst it doesn’t look much, it did fill my shoes and I had to walk home with shoes full of shitty water. Then a shower, then blog, then work!

Why can we not prepare for weather?