Face to Face

I had another great day out yesterday. Once again, I was working directly with practitioners.

Sincerest thanks to West Thames College, in Isleworth for inviting me down to deliver two sessions on the pedagogical use of mobile phones in teaching and learning

And thank you too, to the thirty odd staff members that passed my way for being so receptive, positive and enthusiastic. Your students are very lucky.

Since the downturn, I’ve found it hard to get this type of face-to-face event, but every time I do I come away reinvigorated and recharged.

Since all of the national eCPD progammes stopped, several colleges and providers have been kind enough to invite me in on their staff training days and each one has told the same story: Practitioners still need help in learning how to utilise technology in teaching and learning and how to recognise opportunities for that utilisation – the difference is that they are now ready to accept this learning.

There is nothing like face-to-face workshops to encourage this kind of development. I never just deliver, I always show and then allow time for practice. Yesterday it was TEXTING (we all sent texts and explored Wordle as an aside) >> PEDAGOGY (some Q&A interaction around Bloom’s Taxonomy) >> QR CODES (everyone created codes and discussed uses) >> MULTI-MEDIA (we looked at iPadio, and sent photos and videos to Flickr). Everyone contributed and everyone stayed on board. Well done.

Over the last twelve months, I’ve also been invited to lead workshops at Blackburn College, Gloucestershire College, Leeds College of Music, Pontefract New College and at a small number of events with mixed audiences. Each time it has been like giving ice creams to children: much appreciated and very much enjoyed.

Thanks again to all concerned.

https://eduvel.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/boring-ict/

https://eduvel.wordpress.com/2012/01/29/enaging-with-moodle/

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Jaiku and the like

I’ve been a fan of social media for several years now.

My interest began with Jaiku, which uniquely allowed conversations to be grouped and which allowed replies to exceed the normal 140-character rule then the norm with Twitter.

I first mentioned Jaiku in my old self-hosted blog and this is the earliest post I can find on WayBackMachine.

Sadly the site was soon gobbled up by Google as part of an early attempt to join the burgeoning social media explosion.

Google tried and failed to compete with Twitter and Facebook with their Wave and Buzz, neither of which caught anyone’s attention. They eventually came up with Google+, which seems to have attracted more widespread attention.

I regularly access Twitter and Facebook, as both reader and contributor. But how many sites do I have to visit to keep up with all of my online chums and family?

I can find my peers on Twitter and regularly find things that support my own CPD. I also share things that interest me, mainly work things, but often more light hearted things too.

Some of this occurs with Facebook too, but I tend to use this more flippantly and really only go there to see what friends and family from across the world are doing or to share scurrilous stuff that amuses me.

But I don’t visit either site as much as I once did, mainly because much of my recent work has been ‘online’ and both sites have become a distraction. Actually, that’s untrue, I do visit them regularly, but not at the times I used to (I used to access pretty much synchronously). Now they often have to wait until I pick up my iPad and view the posts via Flipboard – which is a much nicer experience.

I’ve been reluctant to move over to (or to ALSO access) Google+ because I really don’t have the time to get involved over there as well. I already have to make critical decisions about how, where and when I communicate with colleagues and friends. I’m lucky enough to have a good number of online friends, that I can call friends – because I’ve met them, often I’ve also worked with them and I can trust them and their judgment.

However, my F2F friends, those I went to school with or met in another ‘work’ life, do not generally have such a rich and powerful online presence as me, so I’m used to contacting them by telephone, text and/or email. I’m sort of worn out now, with all of the ways available to communicate.

It’s like those days of Betamax, VHS and Video2000 – so much choice, but no clear winner. Yet.

New School Lunch Standards (USA)

Guest Post

Regular readers will be aware that I have occasionally presented ‘Guest Posts’ on behalf of colleagues.  I’d like to introduce yet another Trans-Atlantic contribution. I published a similar post, regarding school food and child obesity, last September.

This time by Jacelyn Thomas [see by-line below].  We would both welcome your comments to this special Guest Post, especially as schools meals is such a big subject over here in the UK too.

New School Lunch Standards Aim to Reduce Child Obesity, But will it Really Help?

Obesity—it’s an ongoing epidemic that some medical experts argue should be treated as an addiction, just like alcohol and marijuana.  It’s a condition that has cost U.S. taxpayers more than $92 billion over the years and has contributed to a plethora of health issues—especially for our younger generation. In fact, childhood obesity has tripled in the last 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

So who’s to blame for our youth’s rapid weight gain? School cafeteria lunch programs, many argue. It’s no surprise either. Children have access to an array of unhealthy food options for school lunch including greasy pizza, hamburgers, fried chicken tenders, French fries and the new favorite, Flaming Hot Cheetos.

In an effort to get to the root of the problem however, the United States Department of Agriculture finally launched a new initiative last week that will change the standard of school lunches, the first major school meal reform made in 15 years. The push was part of First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move!  Campaign designed to get children to get healthier.

Under the new standard, public schools are now required to double the amount of fruits and vegetables offered daily as well as offer only whole-grain products and low-fat or fat-free milk. The sodium and trans fat levels will also be reduced. Caloric intake will also be strictly monitored: students in kindergarten through the fifth grade will be limited to an average of 550 to 650 calories for lunch, for example.

“We want the food [children] get in school to be the same kind of food we would serve at our own kitchen tables,” Mrs. Obama said in a press release.While Mrs. Obama’s intentions are good, the question still remains: do parents actually feed their children nutritious foods at home? Many studies point to no: families rarely dine together anymore, the fast growing number of single-mothers who are pressed for time resort to take-out or fast food to get a meal on the table, and sometimes lower-socioeconomic families can’t afford healthier food options, so they’ll feed a $1 Hot N Spicy McChicken off the value menu to their child instead.

Not to mention, it’s not like this sort of health conscious movement hasn’t been attempted already—a Los Angeles school district changed its lunch options in late January, offering healthier alternative food choices like wheat pasta, Greek salads and turkey burgers just to name a few. While most faculty members and parents were gun-ho about the changes, according to news reports most of the students find the healthy food options “inedible” and even prompt some children to venture off to the local corner store to smuggle-in chips and other salty snacks. Those who are not as sleuth-ey sometimes just skip lunch all together. So will this mandatory nationwide school lunch reform actually solve anything?

In short, bad eating habits are a choice—those that want to eat poorly are going to find a way to do so. And unless good eating habits are introduced to someone as an infant, reforming school lunches won’t help much—but it is a start. That said, it’s really important parents take the initiative to make some major food changes at home, otherwise the food changes made at school will be ineffective.

Byline:

This is a guest post from Jacelyn Thomas. Jacelyn writes about identity theft for IdentityTheft.net. She can be reached at: jacelyn.thomas @ gmail.com.

Picture credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/5790773819/ 
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