Naschtmarkt

The Naschtmarkt in Vienna is just a market. You can find markets that are similar to this in big cities all over the world, but this one has something quite unique. I’m not sure what that is, but I’ve not had so much fun walking around a market for a long time. First of all there is produce from all over the world, which is normal, but the combinations and sheer blousiness of produce was impressive. The stallholders were happy to let us taste all sorts of things – sometimes time and time again. We saw truffles: real, live, black, white, whole truffles – expensive, but truffles nevertheless – something I’ve never seen on a market before.

Following dinner, which I can relate below, we chose to return to the market for dessert. This ended up being glasses of Italian sparkling rose wine (kindly supplied by Christophe) and a plate of Parma ham, meaty olives and Austrian cheeses. Sharing these made for a great atmosphere, but one that (looking at the weather today – Monday) might be hard to repeat.

Right at the end of Naschtmarkt, just down the road from the Art Nouveau (Jugendstil) Secession [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_Secession] building, there are two other preserved Art Nouveau buildings; Majolikahaus and Otto Wagner-Haus. The former is a wonderfully painted example and the latter an ornate building with some kind of gargoyles sat on the roof screaming down at passers by. Our dinner was in a restaurant just a street behind these and a little way along. I can’t remember its name or the street but it’s worth giving a miss anyway.

Our ‘final’ dinner was already depleted by the absence of Czechs, but as there was no one else in the restaurant for the rest of the night, atmosphere was something we eight struggled to achieve. We did manage it, but it was personal – unlike the restaurant. The menu wasn’t extensive but it did look nice. I had duck and thoroughly enjoyed it.

However, one of our Austrian hosts (Michaela) suggested to the waiter that her food; a herb ravioli, was cold.  It was probably lukewarm, but not to her taste anyway (or mine actually, I like hot food hot and cold food cold).  Our waiter seemed unable to comprehend and called a more senior colleague to deal with ‘the problem’.

This more senior person took Michaela’s plate, stood behind her (but in full view of six of the eight of us) and prodded the food with the back of his hand before saying no – it’s hot!

I was stunned. This just should not happen. I couldn’t speak for trying to compose a stream of forceful but understandable pidgin German to rebuke him with. And then he prodded it again (chuntering all the time) as he obeyed Michaela’s command to take it away and bring her a hot dish. I’m sure that the returned dish was just microwaved – which was another appalling example of bad taste, poor hygiene and incompetence.

As I said earlier, my own food was fine, but this surly, superior and downright unhygienic attitude to food service should not be allowed. First of all – the customer is always right (even if they are wrong – which, in this case they were not) and secondly, you should not touch the food in any way – at all – ever – in front of the customer. If a dish is returned, you should start again not zap it in the microwave. Grrr.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: